Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Last week
  2. We all know all about the magic of the FA Cup. The fact that you could have a Non-League team come face to face with one of the Premier League Big Boys. A David and Goliath situation. Giant killings have been a theme of the tournament and it’s what makes it so special to each fan. But recently, there has been talks of scrapping replays within the Cup. It’s fair to say that the talks have receive both negative and positive feedback. But should the Cup really abandon replays? Those who have wish for the Cup to abolish replays have come up with some suggestions to adapt the Cup into life without replays. Such ideas have been... - If, after 90 mins, the scores are level, the match should go straight to a penalty shootout. As is the case in the Carabao Cup - Minnows to play at home when they face a Premier League team Minnows being at home could guarantee a sellout crowd, it could be beneficial to the club by having such a high profile club visit the stadium and could also give them the advantage needed to progress to the next round. But what if it doesn’t happen as it’s supposed to? Replays could be financially beneficial to lower league clubs. We’ve seen it in recent times where a club from League One or Two or even as far down as Non-League where clubs have found themselves struggling financially. Some have even faced winding up orders, some even liquidated. Simply because they could not afford the money needed to keep them afloat. FA Cup replays could well stabalise a club and help them move forward. Granted, rather than a replay and being able to go straight to penalties might give a minnow the chance to get through to the next round which would be huge in terms of prize money. But, that is not a guarantee. Where as, getting a replay guarantees them an income and possibly the chance to earn extra based on TV Coverage. The minnows being at home almost certainly guarantees a bumper crowd especially if the likes of Liverpool or Man City come calling. However, it could be a stadium with a max capacity of 5,000, which yes would be good for the club to sell out, but had if there was a replay you have the chance to visit Anfield or the Etihad where you could be taking more than 3x the amount you’d have at home. Imagine the finances behind those ticket sales. It comes as no surprise that it’s mostly those with associations to the “elite” clubs in England that have called for this rule change to be applied, based on fixture congestion. But no body seems to bat an eye lid when it comes to Non-League clubs starting there season early in FA Cup qualifications and then to fit in a congested fixture list of their own, despite with in some cases not every player is full time. Some of the clubs that appear in the FA Cup and can cause giant killings have players that work outside of football, some have even gone to the match straight from work or vice versa going to work from the match. It’s not just the fact of the money earnt, which in fairness, the bigger clubs aren’t one bit concerned about as much as a club from the lower tiers would benefit hugely from. But when you take into consideration that a club from a lower tier could take a big club to a replay and possibly experience playing at a Premier League ground, something many would have dreamed about and the fans would love to see. That’s what the FA Cup is all about, that’s the magic. Taking away replays would all but kill the competition. The Carabao Cup is already seen by most fans and teams alike as a nothing tournament until the Semi Final, so taking away replays and adapting a format in the FA Cup similar to that of the Carabao Cup would transform it into another nonsense Cup that clubs won’t want to compete for. Then all that magic will disappear. Share your thoughts about this feature article on Football Manics by signing up for FREE to the website, visiting the forum and joining the chat with fellow football fans.
  3. Earlier
  4. The Premier League introduced VAR for the first time this season but it hasn’t been without controversy. During its debut season, it’s received a lot of negative feedback, there has been social media takes on VAR which has prompted groups to form against the technology and use #VAROUT. Football Law Makers have already stated that the use of VAR within the Premier League is not being used correctly and should only be used for clear and obvious decisions, not the nit picking offside decisions we have seen that has caused most of the outrage to form against. When you look at some of the decisions it’s not hard to see why people want to see the end of it already, there has been offside decisions against someone for having an armpit in an offside position, a heel in an offside position. We’re talking millimetres offside which wouldn’t be visible to the Naked eye in real time. It won’t be long till we are seeing someone called offside for having a hair or even nose in an offside position. Just last week, there was a decision made by VAR in the game between Sheffield United and West Ham. Sheffield United were leading the game 1-0 when in the 90th minute Robert Snodgrass grabbed what looked like being the equaliser for the hammers but for VAR to disallow the goal for a handball against Declan Rice in the build up to the goal. But even replays show that the ball was headed onto the arm of Rice and those who seen the replay would agree that there was no stopping this and the handball was totally accidental. Even VAR didn’t get the decision right. Since VAR has been introduced, the linesman has to keep his flag down and let play progress. But say a player is played in behind the defence and he chases the ball and damages his Hamstring or is brought down by the defender and suffer a nasty injury, all that could have been prevented if the linesman flagged for offside. If the decision is clear, that a player is standing offside, the linesman should flag and free kick awarded as happened before VAR. The FA Cup introduced VAR last season and has continued this season, but the technology is only used at Premier League grounds. Which gives an unfair advantage and could determine winners and losers in games. An example of this exact occasion could be seen during the Chelsea v Nottingham Forest game, where Forest were denied a goal because of an arm being offside and VAR ruling the goal out. But had that been at the City Ground, the goal might have stood and been a completely different game because VAR wouldn’t have been in operation. A lower tiered club could benefit financially from a replay but with VAR decisions not at their ground, it gives an unfair advantage. But, VAR is not all bad. Believe it or not, VAR has some good points to it’s game. Take for example the 2018 World Cup. VAR was used the way it should have been, yes the games were slowed down but the decisions were correct and on the biggest stage of them all, it saw many teams benefit from vital decisions. The game in the 3rd round of the FA Cup between Derby and Crystal Palace, the referee used it the way it was designed to be handled. After an altercation between Huddles tone and Milovjevic, the referee awarded both players a yellow card. But the referee was informed of the altercation by those in charge of VAR. Rather than listen to what they had to say, like most referees have this season, he went over to the monitor and reviewed the situation himself which resulted in Palace’s Milovjevic being sent off. VAR can be included in the game, but there is a lot to be improved with the technology if it is too succeed and continue to be a part of our game. It might slow the game down, it might take a while for the referees to get the decisions right but in time the process will be speeded up. All that needs to change is use the technology the way it was designed, that is for clear and obvious errors and stop nit picking at tiny little details. The referee should also take charge more, review the situation himself and make the call based on what he has seen rather than listen to those in the VAR room and trust their judgement. Until the main issues are addressed, fans and pundits alike will continue to push VAR out. Share your thoughts about this feature article on Football Manics by signing up for FREE to the website, visiting the forum and joining the chat with fellow football fans.
  5. League sponsors, television deals, football kits and managers. All these have changed over the last nine years in the Premier League with one constant remaining: David Silva being the best Spanish import English football has ever seen. In the following paragraphs, I am going to give my opinion on why Silva is worthy of this title. Signing from Valencia in July 2010 for £26 million, the attacking midfielder known as ‘El Mago’ joined Manchester City stating that he wanted to bring success and trophies to the Cityzens. Mirroring his playing style, Silva managed to assist City in bringing trophies to the Etihad Stadium, winning the club’s first league title since 1968 in the 2011/2012 season thanks to the world famous Aguero goal in the dying seconds of the last game of the season. Going on to lift the league title again in 2014 and 2018 David Silva was instrumental in another moment in Manchester City’s history adding more silverware to his collection. Only winning player of the month once so far in September 2011, this also represents how underrated the World Cup winner is. Being compared to fine wine by fellow Spanish national and current City manager Pep Guardiola, the attacking playmaker is getting better as the years roll one. Relating his performances in the Premier League to his statistics, Silva boasts 54 goals and 81 assists to date after appearing 275 times in the division. In total, he has contributed to 135 goals since arriving in England, which is an impressive feat from a midfielder, who has to track back and defend more in Pep’s playing style since arriving in 2016. Being the best Spanish player in Premier League history is not easy task for City’s magician with 133 Spanish players gracing the league since it formed. The best being considered alongside Silva are the likes of: Fernando Torres firing for Liverpool and Chelsea in his peak, Xabi Alonso being irreplaceable in 2005 when Liverpool won the Champions League, and Cesc Fàbregas’ involvement in a winning Arsenal and Chelsea side not going unnoticed. Contribution to goals is vital for developing and playing in a team that desires and craves a winning mentality and philosophy. Standing at 135 goals and assists so far with two more years on his contract will allow Silva to strive for a round 200 which would establish him as the best Spanish player in Premier League history as well as one of the best creative midfielders the league has ever seen in my opinion. Fernando Torres ended his Premier League career on 85 goals and 29 assists after playing for Liverpool and Chelsea, winning the Champions League, FA Cup and Europa League all with the latter club. With a total of 114 goals contributed to, Torres was once considered the best Forward in the Premier League during 2011. Tailing off towards the end of his Chelsea career, as a striker I believe Torres although having a clear eye for goal, does not come close to knocking Silva of the top spot due to Silva contributing more to the game from a position further down the pitch. Xabi Alonso made 143 appearances in the league, scoring 14 goals and assisting 17 during this time. Like Torres, Alonso never lifted the league trophy, an achievement he has often said he had achieved during his career at Liverpool. Alonso’s creativity from box-to-box allowed beautiful spraying passing to open up opposition defences and to control the midfield, but what tips Silva over the mark for me is the recognition of lifting the League trophy not once but three times in his career so far in England while being a prominent name in the City line-up. Following the trend of Spanish maestro’s in England, Cesc Fàbregas became a fan favourite during his time at Arsenal with his array of passing and sensational goals. Second of the all-time list for league assists behind Ryan Giggs’ record of 162, Cesc Fàbregas tallied 111 during his time at two London based clubs, captaining Arsenal and Chelsea retrospectively. With 50 goals also attached to Fàbregas’ record in the league, an impact of 161 goal contributions puts him second on the list in my opinion. So why does Silva tip Fàbregas to the best Spanish player in the history of the Premier League? David Silva is 26 contributed goals of being the best performing Spaniard in the league’s history, and with two years left on his current contract, he is sure to break this record. His incredible feat of numbers is unmatchable when compared to his appearance rate of 275 games played in the league, 69 appearances fewer than Cesc Fàbregas. The impact he creates at City to help win games and trophies while improving his scoring rate each year while aged 33 is testament to how vital he is to the Manchester City team and their quest to continue winning titles and helping to improve the players around him is why I believe David Silva is the best Spanish player in Premier League history. Share your thoughts about this feature article on Football Manics by signing up for FREE to the website, visiting the forum and joining the chat with fellow football fans.
  6. Looking forward to how we grow and seeing you publishing again Chris.
  7. Over the years, Football fans have been divided in opinion whether it be the teams they choose to support or the English midfielder debate of Lampard v Gerrard. Players have often been compared to others that have never played at the same time together and often compared in both prime times. But one rivalry that has got fans debating for the past 10+ years has been that of Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi. It has been an age old battle between 2 of European Footballs greatest ever players. The real question though shouldn't be who's better but should we appreciate these 2 great footballers rather than compare them? As we may never witness another battle quite like this ever again. Some fans will argue the case that Ronaldo has been there and done that in conquering the Premier League and then moving to Spain to conquer more records ,and most recently ventured off to Italy for another challenge, where as Messi has only ever played for Barcelona, a team that has had bags of talent over the years with the likes of Xavi, Iniesta and Co. pulling the strings. There is also the argument that Ronaldo has something Messi has failed to achieve in his career, an International Trophy, with Portugal winning Euro 2016. Despite the efforts of Messi finishing runners up on 4 occassions with Argentina. On the flip side, many people argue the fact that Messi is more of a team player than Ronaldo and will pass up oppurtunities to benefit his team rather than have personal glory. Despite having the likes of Xavi, Iniesta and Co. Is Messi the real reason for Barcelona's dominance since the young Argentinian prodigy arrived on the scene in 2004? His own personal records speak volumes as to say that he could light up any team no matter the players that he is surrounded by and if he was to have joined the same clubs as Ronaldo has been to, might of replicated or beaten his rivals records. Since Ronaldo's arrival at Real Madrid in 2009, there have been 38 El Classico's with Messi's Barcelona coming out the better with 17 wins compared with 10 wins for Ronaldo's Real Madrid and playing out 11 Draws in the timespace from Ronaldo joining and leaving Real Madrid in 2018. It can also be added that during this time, they have a combined 640 La Liga goals in 601 games. Messi 329 goals in 309 games and Ronaldo 311 goals in 292 games. Both goal ratio's are unbelievable, which seems unlikely to be replicated anywhere else in the footballing world. Records and Achievements speak for themselves and these 2 goaliths are not shy when it comes to awards and trophies. Combining the records achieved by both these exceptional players are stats that seems too good to be true. 1,177 goals in 1,464 games at club level - Ronaldo (592 goals, 793 games) 4 different clubs Messi (585 goals, 671 games) 1 club Record goalscorers both Club & International Level - Ronaldo (85 goals, 154 Caps Portugal) (450 goals, 438 games Real Madrid) Messi (65 goals, 128 games Argentina) (585 goals, 671 games Barcelona) Combined personal Awards - 268 Ronaldo - 135 Messi - 133 Both winning the Ballon D'or a record 5 times. Combined Trophies at club level - 58 Messi - 32 Ronaldo - 26 Since Ronaldo joined Real Madrid in 2009 - 40 Messi - 25 Ronaldo - 15 Combined Champions League Goals - 228 in 293 games Ronaldo - 122 in 163 games Messi - 106 in 130 games Ronaldo's notable achievements - - Only player to score 50 or more goals in 6 consecutive seasons - Only player to score 60+ goals in a calendar year for 4 consecutive years. Messi's notable achievements - - World record 91 goals for both club and country in a single calendar year in 2012 - Only player to win more than 1 Club World Cup golden boot Considering all these records, these 2 players will forever go down as Legends. We may never see a battle quite like this ever again and we may never see players destroy records like both Ronaldo and Messi have done over the years. Stats will forever remain and this will forever go down as one of the greatest battles between players in footballing history. There is no comparing these players in their prime, as we are living in the moment of 2 of footballs greatest ever players. But as always, fans will forever be divided as to who is the better player. Should we just appreciate the players while they are still playing? Should we argue as to who was better when both these players retire? Share your thoughts about this feature article on Football Manics by signing up for FREE to the website, visiting the forum and joining the chat with fellow football fans.
  8. It hasn’t been an easy 15 months for myself, however, I really don’t want to go there so early into my first blog – I do want to express how I feel I have let down what was becoming a fantastic team for Football Manics. The departure of Joe massive, we both made a very creative team and my drive hasn’t quite been the same. As a project, I am very passionate about football. I grew up literally playing in my parents garden every single day. From a very young age, all I wanted to be when I grew up was to be a footballer – however, I suffered a severe injury at the age of 16-years-old and my right knee hasn’t been the same since. I don’t want this blog to come across as a sob story, I just want to give readers a glimpse into who runs and manages the site. So who am I? My names Christopher, I’m 31-years-old and I am a big fan of Notts County Football Club. I started Football Manics many moons ago, although it was only the last season and a half whereby Joe plus myself revamped everything. The site grew very well, as did social media and it my expectations. I have always enjoyed talking tactics, having my say about football matters and to say I enjoy the beautiful game – isn’t enough to give it justice. There’s very few things aside from my family that I am obsessed about, so you could easily call me a Football Manic. 2018-19 was the season I promised myself I would make FM even better, however this fell short due to experiencing several dislocations and learning that I suffer from a condition called . I basically can do several cool appearing party tricks, yet the thing which isn’t visible is the amount of pain I am in – I’ve always hidden my struggles to the best of my ability. I thought 2019 would have been much better, however, despite it being a very good year. My mother’s health and other things have kept me busy. Notts County fans chanting to their opposition. It’s certainly not easier being a Notts County fan, with my team glued to the bottom of League Two and looking destined to fall outside of the Football League in the first time in their history. I love Notts, my grandfather took me at an early age and there’s been no looking back. I could have supported Derby County, my father was born there and grew up in a small town called Alfreton. His uncle would take my father down to Derby games, so much like my grandfather football’s always been in my family’s blood. Anyway, that’s enough about me. I’m really not all that special and I don’t pretend to be either. I have always felt there’s been room for an independent site, such as Football Manics, the vision may change but the hopes and dreams don’t. I want to get this project back on the right path, so there’s a lot that will happen. I hope to re-build the team we have and re-connect with those I haven’t spoken to for some time. I just tend to get busy and with various things, it’s not easy but that’s life. I’m very keen to pull in fans, people who can see the vision. I have roped many friends and family members in the past to help out – however, I really would encourage readers of this blog to reach out. Fan related content is very important, I want people who feel they have a fair perspective of what’s happening and I want us to tell the world our thoughts. I know with the right people behind the site, it will only continue to take massive leaps. It’s just difficult when you're one person doing the best that you can, and on top of this I also run one of the UK’s best Fan Sites even if I do say so myself. I’m determined to my best, I believe every fan has a talent of some form and I hope to highlight how we are all creative. Also, I want people who help the site to grow to feel that Football Manics is also theirs. I have run several sites, most of which are modest but my first community does have a very large following – this is ran by a friend these days as I have very little involvement due to my interests changing. I aim to get back to writing more, I miss expressing thoughts and I would say stay tuned. Keep your eyes out! Also, if you read this, please do drop a message saying hello – you can find me on Twitter at @FMCJ10
  9. Here at Football Manics, in our own opinions we are analysing the Top 5 Players from the Premier League. Here is a list, in no particular order, of the players I personally believe to be the best in each league with explanations of why I have chosen these players to be included in the list. There will also be an additional list of players who may have gone under the radar and deserve notable mentions. The Premier League, arguably the best league in the world. Top 5 Eden Hazard - Footwork that could mesmorise and terrorise any defence. The only way that defenders manage to stop him in his tracks is usually to bring him down. Though many believe him to blow hot and cold, when he is on his game, Chelsea usually benefit from him being in the squad. There is no surprise that Real Madrid wanted to recruit him as a replacement for a certain CR7. Sergio Aguero - That moment against QPR to win the title for Manchester City in the 2011/12 season is enough to make him a legend. A prolific goal scorer who can score goals whether it be a simple tap in or an outrageous strike outside the box. He has written himself in both Manchester City and Premier League history books by being Manchester City's all time top goalscorer and only the sixth player to score or assist 200 goals for one club in the Premier League. Virgil Van Dijk - The Liverpool defender has become a firm favourite with his club since his £75million move from Southampton. A solid no nonsense defender who has shown his class in defence which he has shown on multiple occassions which has lead to Liverpool becoming title contenders this season most notably due to a great defensive record which has also been helped by the recent addition of Alisson in goal who has formed a great partnership with his centre back. Christian Eriksen - On his day the Spurs playmaker can change the whole complexion of the game with excellent passing ability and great striking qualities. Whether it be a long range pass or simple keep ball passing he finds himself time and again opening up defences and setting away Spurs front players. If he's not assisting he's more than likely taking a pop at goal and usually finding the net or at least troubling goalkeepers. Kevin De Bruyne - The goal against Brazil and the counter attack he lead against Japan to seal a win for Belgium in the World Cup is just one of the many qualities in which De Bruyne possesses. He was pivotal in Manchester City's record breaking title winning season last season. His distribution to perfectly land the ball at the attackers feet, given that you have the likes of Aguero, Jesus and Sterling up top, it's no surprise that he usually has an assist to his name in most games. Notable Mentions Gabriel Jesus - Coming into the Manchester City will be hard for any striker considering that they are challenging Sergio Aguero for a starting position but Jesus has shown game after game that he is capable of competing with Aguero to become City's main striker. At one point, with Pep Guardiola's squad rotation system, Jesus was often picked ahead of Aguero and kept him out of the team for a few games. Deadly in front of goal with him netting in virtually every game he plays. Gylfi Sigurdsson - Possibly Everton's best player in recent seasons. He is a very similar player to the likes of Christian Eriksen in terms of playmaking abilities and passing ability. Sigurdsson is virtually involved in every goal in which Everton score, whether it be scoring a free kick, assisting an attacker with a delicate through ball or even in the build up play, he will be there heavily involved. Bernardo Silva - Has become a firm favourite with the Blues of Manchester. He shows the abilities of what a great midfielder should possess to become a decent player. His passing is next to none, which you'd expect from a Pep Guardiola team, but also he manages to find himself in pockets of space even when there are players around him watching him every step. David Silva - An ever present for Manchester City, works hard for the team and his passing has been shown to be excellent for years gone by. He finds the space to pop up inside the box to find a way to either square the ball or find the space to take a pop at goal which usually has one outcome which is to hit the back of the net. Andrew Robertson - One of the major factors in Liverpool's push for the title. An excellent left back with the ability to drive forward with the ball and go from defence to attack in a matter of moments. Liverpool have been looking for a left back to fill a void which has been left for years since the days of John Arne Riise but Robertson might just be the answer to there problems. However, the battle for the Premier League's top goalkeeper is still there for the taking. Hugo Lloris, Alisson and David De Gea are all the main contenders. De Gea has stuttered during last years World Cup and at the beginning of the season for his Club but has since shown why he was once regarded as a World Class goalkeeper. Hugo Lloris has been Spurs undoubted number 1 for years and Pochettino has been sure of that having not bought in a serious contender for his number 1 spot showing him the support which any player would love to have and he has certainly repaid his managers faith by making outstanding saves and being a huge part in Tottenham's rise to be a top 4 team in recent years. Alisson may have been an expensive purchase for Liverpool in the summer but he has certainly shown why Liverpool paid all that money for him with his solid performances in goal which has lead to Liverpool being one of the toughest teams to score against this season. Although, early in the season he was almost caught out multiple times with him keeping the ball a little too long trying to play out from the back. Share your thoughts about this feature article on Football Manics by signing up for FREE to the website, visiting the forum and joining the chat with fellow football fans.
  10. St James' Park is the home ground of Newcastle United and it has been since 1892. The stadium is the 7th largest in the UK and the capacity is currently 52,354. It was built in 1892 and expanded in 1998 and again in 2000. Newcastle United were also founded in 1892 and have always been at St James' Park. The stadium has also been used for international football, 2012 Olympics and Rugby matches.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  11. Bloomfield Road is the home ground of Blackpool and has been their home since 1901. They were founded in 1887 and played at several different grounds before permanently moving to Bloomfield Road which was formally known as Gamble's Field when another team played there. The capacity of Bloomfield Road is currently 17,338.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  12. Carrow Road is the home ground of Norwich City since 1935 after moving from The Nest. Norwich City were founded in 1902 and they started playing at Newmarket Road. Carrow Road was built by Norwich City in 1935 because The Nest wasn't big enough for their club and Carrow Road has a capacity of 27,244.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  13. The Stadium of Light is the home ground of Sunderland A.F.C and has been since 1997 after they moved from Roker Park, which was their seventh stadium. Sunderland was founded in 1879 as Sunderland and District Teachers. The current capacity was 49,000 which was expanded from 42,000 in 2000.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  14. Stadium MK is the home ground of Milton Keynes Dons and has been since 2007. MK Dons first ground before moving to Stadium MK was the National Hockey Stadium which was converted for their use. Milton Keynes Dons were founded in 2004 after moving to Milton Keynes. They were previously known as Wimbledon FC who were founded in 1889. Stadium MK was built in 2007 and currently has a capacity of 30,500.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  15. Molineux Stadium is the home ground of Wolverhampton Wanderers and has been since 1889, when they moved from Dudley Road. Wolves started out on field on Goldthorn Hill in the Blakenhall area. Wolverhampton Wanderers were founded in 1877 as St Luke's FC. Molineux Stadium was built in 1889 and the current capacity is 32,050 with development plans to extend the capacity to 38,000.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  16. Ewood Park is the home ground of Blackburn Rovers. It was built in 1882 named Ewood Park but Blackburn Rovers were playing on the ground when it was just a field, since they were founded in 1881 when it was known as Ewood Bridge. The current capacity is 31,367 and now has four stands.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  17. Ricoh Arena is the home ground of Coventry City and also used by Wasps Rugby Union. The ground was formally known as City of Coventry Stadium specifically for the 2012 summer olympic games. Coventry City have played at many grounds since they founded in 1883 as Singers FC. Ricoh Arena has been their ground twice, the first time from 2005-2013 and they returned in 2014. The current capacity is 32,609.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  18. Villa Park is the home ground of Aston Villa. They were founded in 1897 and moved to the ground, formally known as Aston Lower Grounds. The stadium has gone through various renovations over the years. The current capacity of Villa Park is 42,682 and has plans to increase it to 50,000. The ground was also formally Aston Hall, a jacobean stately home.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

     

    From £12.00

  19. Sincil Bank is the home ground of Lincoln City and has been since 1895, they moved from John O'Gaunts ground. Lincoln were founded in 1884. The stadium was built in 1894 and the current capacity is 10,120 with the largest stand holding more than half of the full capacity.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  20. Britannia Stadium currently named Bet365 Stadium has been Stoke City's home ground since 1997, they moved from Victoria Ground which they had occupied since 1878. Stoke City were founded in 1863 as Stoke Ramblers FC and officially changed their name to Stoke City in 1878. Britannia Stadium's current capacity is 30,089 after expansion in 2017.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  21. Valley Parade is the home of Bradford City and has been their home since 1903. The ground has been previously used by Bradford(Park Avenue). Manningham RFC which was Bradford City's rugby league name before it became a football club in 1903. The current capacity of Valley Parade is 25,136.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  22. Type: Raffle

    COMPLETED

    • 4 Prizes
    • 0 Participants
    • 0 Tickets taken

    There will be 25 participants required to complete this raffle. The winner(s) will be selected automatically at random by our raffle system. Priced at £3.00 per ticket. Prizes are as follows: 2 A3 Prints 1 A3 Print 1 A4 Print £10 Gift Voucher (Any, Amazon, Google, iTunes etc - you name it) All prizes will receive free standard UK Delivery as part of the prize, overseas winners may be required to pay all/some delivery charges. Please visit the "Billing & Purchases Dashboard" to add account credit in order to pay for your ticket(s), once added please follow the on screen information in order to pay for your ticket(s) - note you must be a member and 18 or over to take part. https://footballmanics.com/clients/purchases/ Then come back to the raffle entry, click 'buy' and follow the on screen prompts, please remember to add your actual address as this is required to send out prizes if delivery is required. On the final screen, please choose to pay by 'account credit'. Raffle will be draw the moment the maximum participants have entered, otherwise the raffle's deadline is set to be drawn on the 28th of February at 8:30pm. Thank you for your support and good luck!
  23. Fratton Park remains as the original home of Portsmouth FC, who were founded on 5 April 1898, and is currently the only stadium in English professional football that is not on the mainland island of Great Britain, as it is built on Portsea Island, where the city of Portsmouth is located.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  24. The King Power Stadium is the home of Leicester City, the 2015–2016 champions of the Premier League. The all-seater stadium opened in 2002 and has a capacity of 32,312, the 20th largest football ground in England.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  25. Opened in 1897, Elland Road has been the home of Leeds United FC since the club's formation in 1919. The stadium is the 13th largest football stadium in England, and the fourth largest outside the Premier League. It has hosted FA Cup semi-final matches as a neutral venue, and England international fixtures, and was selected as one of eight Euro 96 venues, as well as hosting Rugby World Cup 2015 games.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  26. Bescot Stadium is the home ground of Walsall Football Club. It was built in 1989–90, by GMI Construction, with a reported build cost of £4.5m and replaced the club's previous ground, Fellows Park, which was located a quarter of a mile away and was the club's home for 94 years.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  27. The City Ground is a football stadium in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, on the banks of the River Trent. It has been home to Nottingham Forest Football Club since 1898, has 30,445 seats, and was a venue when England hosted Euro 96. Across the trent is Notts County's Meadow Lane, the two grounds are the closest professional football stadiums in England.

    Product size:

    A3 print (420 x 297mm)
    A4 print (210 x 297mm)

    All artwork is printed with high quality Epson inks on 300gsm acid free premium paper stock and shipped in protective packaging.

    Please note: Frame not included.

    Shipping information is displayed below, featuring prices, options, estimated delivery dates and shipping size.

    From £12.00

  1. Load more activity

About FM

fmlogobig.png.76d25c486d23d9ed663f8ac42e

Football Manics is an independent football fan site that aims to provide a platform for every football lover and supporter to discuss anything and everything about the beautiful game, regardless of which team they support.

Support FM

Enjoy the content FM offers? Want to help us grow? Please consider donating to our site, it will go a long way towards improving the content FM writes!

donate-pon.png

Meet the Team

CJ CJ Administrators
Cotton84 Cotton84 Administrators
ARLukomski ARLukomski Administrators
Aneesh Aneesh Media

Social Media

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Football Manics uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. To approve, simply continue using the site or click 'I accept'. Terms of Use.